Project team

The project team consists of academics with an interest in using interprofessional education (IPE) to enhance the teaching of medication safety. True to the vision of the project, the team is working together collaboratively in an interprofessional manner, drawing on their professional expertise in the fields of nursing, midwifery, pharmacy and medicine.

Project leaders

Professor Tracy Levett-Jones
Professor Tracy Levett-Jones
RN, DipAppSc (Nursing), BN, MEd & Work, PhD

Deputy Head of School (Teaching and Learning), School of Nursing and Midwifery, The University of Newcastle.

Tracy's research interests include: the phenomenon of 'belongingness', clinical education, information and communicating technology, clinical reasoning, simulation, competency development, and patient safety. Tracy's doctoral research explored the clinical learning experiences of students in Australia and the United Kingdom. She has expertise in qualitative and quantitative methodologies and has authored three books on clinical learning, six book chapters, 50 peer reviewed journal publications and over 50 conference papers. Tracy has a broad clinical background and prior to her academic career worked as a women's health nurse, nurse educator and new graduate program coordinator. Tracy is the recipient of seven teaching and learning awards including: the New South Wales Minister for Education Quality Teaching Award, an Australian Learning and Teaching Council Award for Teaching Excellence and a Vice Chancellor's Award for Teaching Excellence. Tracy has led two previous ALTC projects:

  1. Facilitating Work Integrated Learning (wil) through skills-enabled e-portfolios, and
  2. Interprofessional education: Enhancing the teaching of medication safety to nursing, pharmacy and medicine students.
Doctor Conor Gilligan
Doctor Conor Gilligan
BBiomedSci (Hons), PhD

Lecturer, Discipline of Health Behaviour Sciences, School of Medicine and Public Health, The University of Newcastle

Conor is a lecturer in the Discipline of Health Behaviour Sciences, part of a team who teach behavioural sciences and public health to undergraduate and postgraduate students in the Faculty of Health and Faculty of Arts and Education. The Discipline's overall aim is to increase student's knowledge and awareness of the essential role of public health in our community.

Conor's teaching involves co-ordinating and teaching into public health and personal development courses that are part of the PDHPE Education program, as well as teaching interactional skills to Medicine and Pharmacy students. Conor is also involved with training actors as simulated patients, and conducting evaluation and curriculum re-design to improve communication skills education in health fields. This work has been conducted as part of three recent grants in diverse areas including improving the teaching of sensitive issues such as sexuality, and patient-centred counselling for medical students from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, exploring the needs of students from culturally diverse backgrounds learning communication skills in the Pharmacy program, and evaluating the current approach to communication skills training in that program.

Conor's public health research has involved training multidisciplinary healthcare teams to deliver appropriate health interventions to Indigenous women, exploring the health during pregnancy of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women in Far North Queensland, and exploring smoking and other health risks among local Aboriginal communities. Conor's current research work is includes an exploration of adolescent alcohol consumption and the role of parents in predicting, or protecting adolescents from risky alcohol use.

Doctor Teresa (Teri) Stone
Doctor Teresa (Teri) Stone
RN, RMN, BA, MHM, PhD

Senior Lecturer, School of Nursing and Midwifery, The University of Newcastle

Teri is a credentialed Mental Health Nurse and the Bachelor of Nursing Program Convenor at the University of Newcastle Australia. She is also a Clinical Nursing Research Fellow for Hunter New England Mental Health and an early career researcher. Teri has qualifications in general and mental health nursing, a BA in psychology and masters in health management. Her research interests include verbal aggression, mental health education, depression and anxiety. Teri has worked in a variety of settings, in London, Hong Kong and Australia both a clinician and manager. She worked as a remote area nurse in Aboriginal communities and retains a strong interest in Indigenous health. Teri is currently involved in a research study funded by “Beyondblue” to determine whether an education intervention influences nurses' attitudes and response towards colleagues who have a major mental illness. Teri's doctoral research explored the impact of swearing on nurses and its effects on the therapeutic relationship between nurses and patients. Teri has one publication and four conference papers from this doctoral work and received the Hunter Mental health 2006 Award and The Australian College of Mental Health Nursing Award in 2007 for presentations arising from this research.

Doctor Sue Outram
Doctor Sue Outram
RN, BA, PhD

Discipline Lead – Discipline of Health Behaviour Sciences, School of Medicine and Public Health, The University of Newcastle

Sue has been employed in the tertiary sector in the education of health professionals for the past 20 years. She has developed, coordinated and taught innovative curriculum in a wide variety of subjects for undergraduate and postgraduate students of nursing, medicine and allied health. She has led multidisciplinary teams in developing interprofessional curricula in public health and clinical communication skills. Sue leads the interactional skills curriculum (includes medical communication, counselling, behaviour change) in the 5 years of the Bachelor of Medicine program, including clinical schools on remote sites. She has developed a simulated patient program, recruiting and training both actors/simulated patients and tutors for teaching and learning and in standardised roles for assessment. She is experienced in using qualitative and quantitative research methods. Her research interests include mental ill-health and medication use (doctoral study), medical education, and health of Vietnam veterans and their families. In 2008 Sue was awarded the Faculty of Health and the Vice Chancellor's Award for Excellence in Teaching and Learning at the University of Newcastle.

Professor Alison Jones
Professor Alison Jones
BSc (Hons) Biochem, MB ChB, MD, MRCP(UK), FRCPE, FRCP, FRACP, FiBIOL

Dean, School of Medicine, University of Western Sydney

Alison a is Conjoint Professor of Medicine and Clinical Toxicology University of Newcastle, Professor of Medicine and Clinical Toxicology, Dean Elect of the School of Medicine, University of Western Sydney, and Chair of the Hunter New England Quality Use of Medicines Committee. Her research interests include safety of drugs, toxicology, risk communication and medical education. Over the last 5 years she has had 40 papers, 15 book chapters and one book published and been awarded more than $5.9 million in research income.

Professor Gregory Peterson
Professor Gregory Peterson
BPharm (Hons), PhD, MBA, FSHP, FACP, FPS, AACPA

Head of School, School of Pharmacy, University of Tasmania

Since 2000 Greg has held a personal Chair in Pharmacy at the University of Tasmania, awarded on the basis of research and teaching excellence. Greg established and leads an innovative research unit in Improving Medication Outcomes (UMORE; Unit for Medication Outcomes Research and Education) within the School of Pharmacy, University of Tasmania. Greg has broad teaching responsibilities across the areas of clinical pharmacy, clinical pharmacokinetics, pharmacy practice, clinical pharmacology and therapeutics, drug information and applied statistics. He teaches pharmacy, nursing and medical students and is frequently invited to present at State and National Continuing Professional Education Programs and Refresher Courses (including medicine and nursing). Greg has been the recipient of national teaching awards (Committee for the Advancement of University Teaching; CAUT), and University of Tasmania and Royal Hobart Hospital teaching development grants, principally for the development of innovative web-based teaching programs. Greg is a practicing pharmacist (6 hr/week), accredited pharmacist, and part-owner of a large rural community pharmacy. In 2007 he was awarded the Pharmaceutical Society of Australia's highest honour – the Australian Pharmacist of the Year, for 2007.

Ms Joyce Cooper
Ms Joyce Cooper
BSc, GDipClinPharm, GCertTertiaryTeach, MRPharmS

Lecturer, School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy, The University of Newcastle

Joyce is a lecturer in the Master of Pharmacy program at the University of Newcastle. She has extensive experience as a registered pharmacist in both clinical and managerial roles in community and hospital pharmacy settings in the UK and Australia prior to entering academia in 2008, and remains a practicing pharmacist. She has an interest in education with a focus on enhancing the student-centred learning experience, and is an invited contributor for educational programs coordinated by the Pharmaceutical Society of Australia, and the Society of Hospital Pharmacists of Australia. Joyce is also currently pursuing a PhD, researching the factors contributing to the adverse effects of serotonergic medications.

Associate Professor Rohan Rasiah
Associate Professor Rohan Rasiah
BPharm (Hons), MPS, PhD

Deputy President Academic Senate, School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy, The University of Newcastle

Rohan is currently the Chairperson of The University of Newcastle School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy's Teaching and Learning Committee. For the last 3 years he has been the Program Convenor of the Master of Pharmacy program at the University of Newcastle. His teaching duties encompass Pharmacy Practice and Pharmacotherapeutics, with a focus on the integration of communication skills throughout the program. He has been instrumental in the design a new Clinical Skills Unit for Pharmacy students, designed to help illustrate communications skills to the students using innovative simulated learning environments. Prior to his appointment at the University of Newcastle he was the Pharmacist Academic located with the Mt Isa Centre for Rural and Remote Health and a Senior Lecturer with the Bachelor of Pharmacy program at James Cooks University. Dr Rasiah is a practising hospital and community pharmacist.

Mr Samuel Lapkin
Mr Samuel Lapkin
BN (Hons)

PhD Candidate, School of Nursing and Midwifery, The University of Newcastle

Samuel is a member AIPPEN (Australasian Interprofessional Practice and Education Network). Samuel is involved in an ALTC project led by Associate Professor Tracy Levett-Jones and has conducted a systematic review examining the effectiveness of using human patient simulation manikins in the teaching of clinical reasoning skills to undergraduate nursing students. He is currently working as a research assistant and is conducting a systematic review examining the effectiveness of pedagogical approaches used for teaching medication safety to nursing students; and a cost-utility analysis of medium and high fidelity human patient simulation manikins using multi-attribute utility theory.

Doctor Kerry Hoffman
Doctor Kerry Hoffman
RN, MN, Dip HlthSc (Nursing), BSc, Grad Dip Ed, PhD

Lecturer, School of Nursing and Midwifery, The University of Newcastle.

Kerry has experience in critical care nursing and clinical education. She investigated clinical decision-making in her Masters and PhD. Kerry has also completed a study examining critical thinking and clinical decision-making in new graduate nurses. Kerry has authored three peer reviewed journal publications and two refereed international conferences papers on clinical decision-making.

Associate Professor Jenny Schneider
Associate Professor Jenny Schneider
BPharm (Hons), Grad Cert Pall Care, PhD

Pharmacy Program Convenor, School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy, The University of Newcastle.

Ms Lyn Ebert, RN
Ms Lyn Ebert, RN
RM, NN, Grad Dip VET, MPhil

Lecturer and PhD candidate, School of Nursing and Midwifery, The University of Newcastle.

Lyn has been a practicing midwife for 20 years and lecturing into the postgraduate midwifery program at the University of Newcastle for the past ten years. She has recently accepted the position of program convenor for the newly introduced Bachelor of Midwifery program at the University of Newcastle. She is interested in interprofessional education between midwifery and medical students to enhance the student learning experience and interprofessional collegiality within the clinical environment.

Lyn completed her Masters of Philosophy-Midwifery in 2008, looking at the interactions between midwives and women who smoked during pregnancy. She found it is often difficult for midwives to maintain a woman-centred model of interaction with competing organisational and department of health requirements. Findings from her Masters of Philosophy; Midwives' interactions with women who smoke in pregnancy, led her to undertake a Doctor of Philosophy, which she commenced in 2009. Lyn is currently a full time PhD student, exploring the midwifery concept and maternity care philosophy woman-centred care within the maternity care encounters involving socially disadvantaged women. Her professional interest is the education of health professionals in providing woman-centred care for socially disadvantaged women within the maternity contexts of Australia.